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Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Los Angeles Times Breaking news Michael Brown protesters climb into 110 Freeway, block traffic Los Angeles Times | November 24, 2014 | 11:57 PM More than 200 demonstrators marched across Los Angeles on Monday night, closing the 110 Freeway and chanting as they protested a Missouri grand jury's decision not to indict a police officer in the controversial shooting of a black teenager. With police officers standing by, the protesters spent hours marching through the city, at one point crowding outside the LAPD's Southwest station before heading toward the USC campus. University police said the campus was closed to outsiders. For the latest information go to www.latimes.com. ADVERTISEMENT Text "BREAKING" to 52669 to sign up for breaking news text alerts. You will receive 2 msgs/week. Msg&data rates may apply. Text HELP for help. Text STOP to cancel. California and the world: Visit http://www.latimes.com for up-to-the-minute news. Follow @LATimes on Twitter: http://twitter.com/latimes

Los Angeles Times
Breaking news

Michael Brown protesters climb into 110 Freeway, block traffic

Los Angeles Times | November 24, 2014 | 11:57 PM

More than 200 demonstrators marched across Los Angeles on Monday night, closing the 110 Freeway and chanting as they protested a Missouri grand jury's decision not to indict a police officer in the controversial shooting of a black teenager.
With police officers standing by, the protesters spent hours marching through the city, at one point crowding outside the LAPD's Southwest station before heading toward the USC campus.
University police said the campus was closed to outsiders.
For the latest information go to www.latimes.com.
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Monday, November 24, 2014

Caffeine 'cocktail' for stroke by JAMES CHAPMAN, Daily Mail

Caffeine 'cocktail' for stroke

by JAMES CHAPMAN, Daily Mail
Irish coffee has inspired a bizarre treatment which could save stroke victims from severe brain damage, scientists reveal today.
Tests of an injection which mixes caffeine and alcohol suggest it can limit the disability suffered by patients by up to 80 per cent.
The technique is based on the traditional after-dinner drink, in which coffee and whiskey are mixed together with cream carefully poured on top to form a separate layer.
Experts believe the drug - which has the potency of two cups of strong coffee and a shot of spirits - can be injected into the bloodstream up to three hours after a patient is struck down.
Although they are unsure why it works, the breakthrough could be crucial in cutting the toll of death and disability caused by strokes.
Treating and looking after the 140,000 people a year who suffer the condition - usually caused by a blood clot on the brain - costs the Health Service an estimated £2.3billion. Only cancer and heart disease kill more patients.
The experimental drug has been shown to be safe in a pilot study of patients suffering from ischemic stroke, where a clot blocks blood going into the brain.
Unveiling the treatment in Stroke: The Journal of the American Heart Association, scientists said this safety study was a crucial prelude to testing the combination of caffeine and alcohol - called caffeinol - on patients.
In studies on rats, brain damage was reduced by up to 80 per cent when caffeinol was given within three hours of an artery taking blood to the brain being blocked.
'Neither caffeine or alcohol offered protection alone, but the combination was protective,' said Dr James Grotta, professor of neurology and director of stroke research at the University of Texas-Houston Medical School.
In the study on humans, Dr Grotta and his colleagues gave the treatment to 16 female and 17 male stroke victims with an average of 71.
'Our goal was to see if we could safely achieve the same blood levels of caffeinol that we achieved in our animal studies,' said Dr Grotta.
'We discovered that we could use even lower doses than we used in the animal studies and achieve the blood levels that were neuroprotective in animals.'
Importantly, caffeinol can be safely administered to patients also receiving traditional ' clot- busting' drugs used to treat stroke.
However, more research is needed to ensure that caffeinol does not put too much strain on the heart and to judge how well it protects the brain in humans.
In addition, the experts plan a study combining caffeinol with 'thermo- cooling' after tests suggested that cooling the brain can limit stroke damage.
j.chapman@dailymail.co.uk


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-176352/Caffeine-cocktail-stroke.html#ixzz3K41AbuRM
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Perello wins Oxnard City Council seat Gretchen Wenner VC Star

Perello wins Oxnard City Council seat

VENTURA, Calif. - By a 10-vote margin, Oxnard City Councilman Bert Perello won reelection, according to final results released Monday.
Perello, first elected to the council in the June 2013 special election, barely bested challenger Steve Huber, who originally led the contest for a second council seat when initial results came in after the Nov. 4 election.
Perello ended up with 6,680 votes, or about 15.2 percent of the total. Huber’s count was 6,670. Less than a tenth of a percentage point separated them.
Oxnard voters chose two candidates from a field of seven. Incumbent Carmen Ramirez easily won a second term with 13,510 votes, or more than 30 percent of the total.
“I’ve already congratulated Bert,” Huber said Monday evening. He added he is still looking at his options, including a possible recount, but hasn’t made a decision. He also wonders if a mandatory recount might be required.
“I have more questions than I have answers,” he said.
Perello could not immediately be reached Monday evening.
In the mayoral contest, Mayor Tim Flynn bested two challengers, including a bid from Councilman Bryan MacDonald, with 59 percent of the total, or 15,764 votes. MacDonald, who will keep his council seat, wound up with 8,285 votes. Larry Stein pulled in 2,157. Oxnard’s mayor is elected every two years, with council members serving four-year terms.
In another close outcome, a measure that would increase salaries for Fillmore City Council members passed by 49 votes. Measure H received “yes votes” from 1,255 voters, or about 51 percent. The measure would allow City Council salaries to rise from $75 a month to $300, the state limit for a city that size.
The results released Monday by the Ventura County Elections Division are the final, certified numbers submitted to the state, which were due by Dec. 2.

Chuck Hagel Stepping Down As Secretary Of Defense AP | By JULIE PACE and ROBERT BURNS

Chuck Hagel Stepping Down As Secretary Of Defense

Posted: Updated: 
WASHINGTON (AP) — Under pressure from President Barack Obama, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel submitted his resignation Monday amid White House concerns about his effectiveness and broader criticism from outside about the administration's Middle East crisis management.
The president said he and Hagel had determined it was an "appropriate time for him to complete his service."
Hagel, a former Republican senator, never broke through the White House's notably insular national security team. Officials privately griped about his ability to publicly communicate administration policy and more recently questioned whether he had the capacity to oversee new military campaigns against the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria.
Hagel is the first high-level member of Obama's national security team to step down in the wake of both a disastrous midterm election for the president's party and persistent criticism about the administration's policies in the Middle East and elsewhere. It's unclear whether Hagel's forced resignation signals the start of a broader shake-up of the president's team; White House officials said it was possible there could be more departures.
Among the leading contenders to replace Hagel is Michele Flournoy, who served as the Pentagon's policy chief for the first three years of Obama's presidency. Flournoy, who would be the first woman to head the Pentagon, is now chief executive officer of the Center for a New American Security, a think tank that she co-founded.
Flournoy is said to be interested in the top Pentagon job but seeking assurances from the White House that she would be given greater latitude in policymaking than Hagel. Flournoy is also considered a possible defense secretary for Hillary Rodham Clinton if Clinton should win the presidency in 2016.
Others mentioned as possible replacements include Ashton Carter, the former deputy defense secretary, and Robert Work, who currently holds that post.
With Hagel's departure, Obama will be the first president since Harry Truman to have four defense secretaries. Hagel's two predecessors, Robert Gates and Leon Panetta, complained after leaving the administration about White House micromanagement and political interference in policy decisions.
Rep. Buck McKeon, chair of the House Armed Services Committee, suggested Obama consider his own role in his administration's foreign policy struggles rather than seeking another changeover at the Pentagon.
"When the president goes through three secretaries, he should ask, 'Is it them or is it me?'" said McKeon, R-Calif.
Hagel has had his own frustrations with the White House. In recent weeks, he sent a letter to National Security Adviser Susan Rice in which he said Obama needed to articulate a clearer view of the administration's approach to dealing with Syrian President Bashar Assad. The letter is said to have angered White House officials.
In some ways, Hagel was seen as an attempt by the White House to install a Pentagon chief who would be less likely than Gates and Panetta to pitch policy fights with the West Wing. Some foreign policy experts noted the irony in the White House ousting a defense secretary who largely played the role the president appeared to have been seeking.
"The White House picked him because they wanted somebody they could control and would be a policy nonentity and they got a policy nonentity," said Rosa Brooks, who served at the Pentagon during Obama's first term. "It seems unfair to make him a fall guy for White House policy failures."
The timing of Hagel's departure sets up a potential confirmation fight in the Senate. Republicans, who will take control of the body next month, have been deeply critical of the president's foreign policy.
Hagel submitted his resignation letter to Obama on Monday morning after what his advisers said were a series of private discussions about his future that he initiated with Obama last month. The 68-year-old has agreed to remain in office until a successor is confirmed by the Senate.
Hagel's aides assert that he is leaving at an appropriate juncture. The aides were vague about what persuaded him to quit, suggesting that he ultimately agreed with Obama that the Pentagon needed a new leadership focus for the coming two years.
Hagel has steered the Pentagon through a major review of nuclear weapons management, as well as reforms to the military justice system and to the military health system. But his departure also coincides with a period of great uncertainty over the course of the administration's campaign to defeat the Islamic State group, as well as worry over Russia's actions in Ukraine, and further defense budget cuts.
Indeed, the current landscape looks far different from when Hagel was brought in to oversee the drawdown of the Afghanistan war and navigate the Pentagon through the cutbacks. White House officials suggested the shift in emphasis was behind the need for a change in leadership.
Hagel served as senator from Nebraska and became a critic of U.S. involvement in Iraq. He forged a strong personal relationship with Obama in the Senate and they made several overseas trips together, including the high-profile visit Obama made in the final months before the 2008 presidential campaign. Hagel also carved out a reputation as an independent thinker and blunt speaker, and Obama said he came to admire his courage and willingness to speak his mind.
Hagel was the first enlisted combat military veteran to become secretary of defense. He served in the Vietnam War and received two Purple Hearts.
As he announced his resignation Monday, Hagel said it was "the greatest privilege of my life to lead and, most important, to serve with the men and women of the Defense Department and support their families."

Sunday, November 23, 2014

New York Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. made what may be the most incredible touchdown catch that most football fans will see in 2014

https://twitter.com/nfl/status/536704242870804481    There are not enough superlatives.
New York Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. made what may be the most incredible touchdown catch that most football fans will see in 2014 -- or ever. The 22-year-old rookie's jaw-dropping one-handed grab, made while falling down perilously close to the sideline after illegal contact from a defender, pushed the Giants further ahead of the Dallas Cowboys on "Sunday Night Football" and absolutely stunned everyone who saw it.
"There is your play of the year, maybe of the decade, whatever," NBC's Al Michaels said while watching a replay of the incredible grab. "That is just impossible."

Allama Iqbal on Ahmadism answer to J. Nehru letter 1935



Allama Iqbal on Ahmedism answer to J. Nehru letter 1935

'via Blog this'

Karachi's political future will be all about negotiating Haris Gazdar

Karachi's political future will be all about negotiating
By Tooba Masood

KARACHI: 
When Arif Hasan introduced Haris Gazdar, he said: "I always think there is something wrong with him because he thinks differently." And he does.
Gazdar started the fifth session of the second Karachi conference at the Arts Council by warning the audience that he would bore them with a lot of large numbers. He was wrong. Instead of boring the audience, he made them all think – think about Karachi's population, housing and most importantly – he made them question how big the city they live in really was – and how it was going to keep on growing.
Gazdar's work primarily focuses on politics of regularisation – which is how he met Orangi Pilot Project's late Perween Rehman. "We weren't just colleagues, we were friends," he said during Saturday's session. "Her work has been of great help to us. It gave us a much-needed insight into the politics of Karachi."

While talking about regularised and irregular settlements in the city, Gazdar said that more than 50 per cent of Karachi started life as an irregular settlement. "What I really want to know, how big is Karachi," he said. "Some people say there are about 18 million people in this city, some take the numbers up to 25 million. I believe that there are roughly 15 million people residing here." He added that if they went by the 1998 population census, we wouldn't even reach 20 million by 2030.
Around 2006, he said, they noticed an error in the census. "They learnt that around 10 per cent of the population which included non-residents, such as Bengalis, Afghans and others had not been counted for," he said. "The evidence is mixed and changes the population projections and growth rate. If the 10 per cent is included now, we would have gone beyond 25 million a while ago."
Breaking up the population according to groups, Gazdar said that the Urdu-speaking population in 1998 was 49 per cent – if they go by what they now know, by 2025, the Urdu-speaking population would go down to approximately 42 per cent.
"The error in the census, creates a need for exceptions – all periods are exceptional, and trends take this in, when baseline numbers are big," he said. "It led us to think – if Karachi is bigger than we thought, the Urdu speaking proportion is smaller than we thought and vice versa or if the Pashto-speaking population is bigger than we thought, then it is correspondingly smaller in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa?"
"In the future, politics in a city like Karachi will be all about negotiating between different ethnicities." He added that urban governance needs to be more proactive and show support and celebrate ethnic plurality, rather than ignore it.
Gazdar's presentation was followed by a quick Powerpoint from Mansoor Raza, the deputy director of advocacy and research for the Community World Service. He has dealt with disaster management and response activities along with mitigation plans for Pakistan. Raza spoke at length about Karachi and its traffic issues which he claims are growingby 7.2 per cent annually. He said that the city's transport issues are a result of its in-transition socio-economic realities. Mass transit, he said, cannot be sustained in Karachi without the government helping out with expenses. He added that because of this, Qingqis have filled up the travel vacuum in the city and will keep doing so.
Dr Noman Ahmed also presented a paper during the session. He talked about land issues in Karachi and how they impact the dynamics of urban management and development in Karachi. Ahmed, who is an architect, has worked extensively on planning, Karachi's water issues, and has also written two books. His presentation looked at the people, organisations and departments – formal and informal bodies, governing land in the city.

Published in The Express Tribune, November 23rd, 2014.

Iqbal  Quidwai   


 

Friday, November 21, 2014

Radical face of Saudi Wahhabism & ISIS..Al Quaida


Iqbal 



And related material...
I didn't know Wahab was a bandit also! Maybe it is fitting the ethically challenged Ibn Saud and Gulf rlers cozened on to him.





"The two Gulf states have spent billions of dollars on promoting a militant and proselytising interpretation of their faith derived from Abdul Wahhab, an eighteenth century scholar, and based on the Salaf, or the original followers of the Prophet.
But the rulers of both countries are now more threatened by their creation than Britain or America, argued Gen Shaw. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil) has vowed to topple the Qatari and Saudi regimes, viewing both as corrupt outposts of decadence and sin.
So Qatar and Saudi Arabia have every reason to lead an ideological struggle against Isil, said Gen Shaw. On its own, he added, the West's military offensive against the terrorist movement was likely to prove "futile"."
Qatar and Saudi Arabia 'have ignited time bomb by funding global spread of radical Islam'
General Jonathan Shaw, Britain's former Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff, says Qatar and Saudi Arabia responsible for spread of radical Islam



OPINION: The Islamic State's Ideology Is Grounded in Saudi Education


  Saudis Reveal Their True Feelings About ISIS on Twitter
They blame the clergy. The social network's free discussion contrasts with Riyadh's official line on the rise of radicals




Why ISIS is a threat to Saudi Arabia: Wahhabism's deferred promise
 

"If there were a prize for Most Irresponsible Foreign Policy it would surely be awarded to Saudi Arabia. It is the nation most responsible for the rise of Islamic radicalism and militancy around the world. Over the past four decades, the kingdom's immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme, intolerant and violent version of Islam preached by its Wahhabi clerics."

  Zakaria: The Saudis Are Mad? Tough!
Why we shouldn't care that the world's most irresponsible country is displeased at the U.S.




He's missing petrodollar creation and megalomaniacal tendencies of the Saudis.


"The agenda of the Islamic State today is merely an extension of the devious plan laid down by Abdul Wahhab almost two hundred years ago

It is ironical indeed that the Turkish regime today is implicated in propping up a terrorist group called the Islamic State (IS), which has vowed to spread Wahhabi Islam all over the world. The present Wahhabism, legitimated and empowered by the Saudi regime, has violent, almost criminal, origins in the 19th century. If we care to look into its beginnings, we won't be surprised at its utter contempt for human life and everything else which doesn't conform to its own narrow/sectarian agenda. Let me explain the irony first.
It was the Ottoman regime which bore the brunt of Wahhabi Islam soon after it became a force in the Central Arab region. The toxic combine of 18th century Islamic scholar Abdul Wahhab and the first monarch of Saudi Arabia Ibn Saud posed a challenge to the Ottoman rule. They also questioned the prevalent Islamic beliefs and practices. The Turks not only defended their power but also assiduously fought for the mystic Islam they had professed and supported all these years. The Ottomans fought and exiled the Wahhabis to the Arab deserts where they remained for almost a century. This Wahhabi bigotry was condemned by the Turks as criminal and unIslamic. The sad irony is that the current Turkish regime has joined the Wahhabi bandwagon, forgetting all about the Bektashis, Qadiris and other dervishes they had cherished all these centuries. The IS agenda today is merely an extension of the devious plan laid down by Abdul Wahhab almost 200 years ago. Let us look at this so-called puritan Islam proposed by the Wahhabis, its violent 'othering' of Muslims they disliked and the parallels with the present day IS terrorists."



 
 


The Hindu

Opinion » Comment

November 19, 2014
Updated: November 19, 2014 01:32 IST

Radical face of Saudi Wahhabism

S. Irfan Habib
Comment (96)   ·   print   ·   T  T  
DANGEROUS LESSONS: If the Islamic State is detonating shrines, it is following the precedent set in the 1920s by the House of Saud. Picture shows the Prophet Younis Mosque after it was destroyed in a bomb attack by Islamic State militants in Mosul.
Reuters DANGEROUS LESSONS: If the Islamic State is detonating shrines, it is following the precedent set in the 1920s by the House of Saud. Picture shows the Prophet Younis Mosque after it was destroyed in a bomb attack by Islamic State militants in Mosul.

The agenda of the Islamic State today is merely an extension of the devious plan laid down by Abdul Wahhab almost two hundred years ago

It is ironical indeed that the Turkish regime today is implicated in propping up a terrorist group called the Islamic State (IS), which has vowed to spread Wahhabi Islam all over the world. The present Wahhabism, legitimated and empowered by the Saudi regime, has violent, almost criminal, origins in the 19th century. If we care to look into its beginnings, we won't be surprised at its utter contempt for human life and everything else which doesn't conform to its own narrow/sectarian agenda. Let me explain the irony first.
It was the Ottoman regime which bore the brunt of Wahhabi Islam soon after it became a force in the Central Arab region. The toxic combine of 18th century Islamic scholar Abdul Wahhab and the first monarch of Saudi Arabia Ibn Saud posed a challenge to the Ottoman rule. They also questioned the prevalent Islamic beliefs and practices. The Turks not only defended their power but also assiduously fought for the mystic Islam they had professed and supported all these years. The Ottomans fought and exiled the Wahhabis to the Arab deserts where they remained for almost a century. This Wahhabi bigotry was condemned by the Turks as criminal and unIslamic. The sad irony is that the current Turkish regime has joined the Wahhabi bandwagon, forgetting all about the Bektashis, Qadiris and other dervishes they had cherished all these centuries. The IS agenda today is merely an extension of the devious plan laid down by Abdul Wahhab almost 200 years ago. Let us look at this so-called puritan Islam proposed by the Wahhabis, its violent 'othering' of Muslims they disliked and the parallels with the present day IS terrorists.
Hate-filled agenda
Muhammad ibn Abdul Wahhab, the founder of Wahhabism, and his radical, exclusionist puritanism became deadlier when Ibn Saud decided to add its religious fervour to his banditry. (The latter was then no more than a minor leader amongst many of continually fighting and raiding Bedouin tribes in the desperately poor deserts of the Nejd.) Thus Abdul Wahhab, in collaboration with Ibn Saud, the founder of Saudi Arabia, laid down its sectarian and hate-filled agenda. He denounced his opponents and all Muslims unwilling to accept his views as idolaters and apostates, and abused the prophets, scholars, saints and other pious figures of the past. All those who did not adhere to his proposed version of Islam were to be killed; their wives and daughters violated. Shias, Sufis, and other Muslims whom he judged unorthodox were to be exterminated, and all other faiths to be humiliated or destroyed. With this awful doctrine, the foundation was laid for Islamic fundamentalism, leading ultimately to terrorism, vitiating the lives of not only Muslims but everyone else in the world.
Most of the so-called Islamic terrorist groups today are inspired by this devious political ideology. Saudi money and power has succeeded in mainstreaming this hate-filled conning of Islam as the true, puritan Islam, where any deviation is dubbed as unIslamic. Unfortunately, most Western writers on Islam took Wahhabi claims to represent reform against the alleged decadence of traditional Islam at face value. American journalist Stephen Schwartz says that the Wahhabi rejection of ostentatious spirituality is much the same as the Protestants detesting the veneration of saints in the Roman Church. Western observers have seen the movement as analogous with Christian Reformation. Sadly, they have failed to make a distinction between reform and bigotry.
IS and other terrorist groups today have taken the original Wahhabi perversion to even greater heights where they don't even refer to their roots. The Saudi regime itself feels threatened by the monster their ideology helped create. They have publicly distanced themselves from IS terrorism and even used the chief cleric of Mecca to declare IS terrorism a heinous crime under sharia law. This is one consistent duplicity which the Saudis have pursued whenever they found themselves stuck in a tight spot.
However, the stark parallels between IS and its ilk and the Saudi-Wahhabi travesty are telling. If IS is detonating shrines, it is following the precedent set in the 1920s by the House of Saud with the Wahhabi-inspired demolition of 1,400-year-old tombs in the Jannat ul Baqi cemetery in Medina. Again, the hatred for the Shia Muslims is one of the core beliefs of the Wahhabis. The earliest destructions and killings they carried out were in Karbala in the early 19th century, which was followed by the looting and wrecking of the tomb of Hussain, the grandson of the Prophet. Whatever be the face, bile against the Shias has remained a constant throughout Wahhabi-Saudi history, which is being carried forward by its latest flag bearers, the IS and Al Qaeda.
Wahhabism's reinvention
Why did hydra-headed Wahhabism become so menacingly active during the past few decades? One factor may be the Iranian Revolution of the 1970s, which was perceived as a threat by Wahhabism that had begun to look dated by then. It, therefore, had to reinvent itself to remain relevant. This reinvention had deadly manifestations such as the Boko Haram, the Al Shabab, the Al Qaeda, the Taliban and now the IS, and many others all over the world. Even Shia Islam changed radically in the post Ayatollah Khomeini era; it is no more as relaxed as it used to be.
The Saudi and Qatari regimes seem to have realised that they have created a monster in ISIS, which is now a threat to their own peaceful existence. Though IS remains deeply Wahhabist, it is ultra radical and "could be seen essentially as a corrective movement to contemporary Wahhabism." Today, a collective military action seems to be the only way to check the IS menace, but a lasting peace in the Islamic world is possible only if a battle is waged within Islam to change the mindset. Besides we need to look beyond the usual Islamophobic and Islamophilic perspectives.
(S. Irfan Habib holds the Maulana Abul Kalam Azad Chair, National University of Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi.)


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Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Pay Just Pennies For Brand-New Products by Taylor Morgan Quibids

Pay Just Pennies For Brand-New Products

While every online shop tries to offer thrilling deals that will save you money, very few can actually make good on their claims, and even fewer can guarantee that you'll have fun doing it.
Well, the deals are still out there, and many are scooping them up from a new online auction website called QuiBids that’s figured out how to sell all the must-have products for prices that are so jaw dropping, you’ll find them hard to believe.
QuiBids' product selection runs from the latest Apple products — iPads, iPods, and MacBooks — to high-definition televisions, gift cards to top retailers, and much more. To name a few recent sale prices of items like this, a New Apple iPad recently sold for $54.03, a Kindle Fire recently sold for $25.32, and a HP Laptop recently sold for $33.33.
With such great prices, it’s natural to be skeptical – so we did some research to learn exactly how they do it.
It happens to be, that the deals are real.  To understand how these deals are possible, you first have to understand QuiBids.  Here’s how it works: QuiBids' auction model differs from the traditional auction format by charging sixty cents to its customers every time they bid. The amount collected for all the bids enables the company to sell the product at a price that’s far below any retail price you’ll find on the web.
While winning an auction is a huge thrill, strategizing over when to bid and how many bids to commit to a particular auction is a ton of fun too. Every time a user bids, no more than 20 seconds is added to the auction clock, and the last person to bid when the clock runs out claims the right to purchase the item at the discounted price. CEO Matt Beckham said that QuiBids is growing rapidly, and that their number of customers now reaches into the millions. “This is a new type of shopping that appeals to a mass audience.  Consumers expect more when they shop these days and QuiBids offers that,” he said.
For an auction winner, the true cost of an item won at auction is a bit higher than the final auction price because of the amount the auction winner spent bidding to win. But it’s typically modest, and even after bids, most winners save at least 75% off retail.
But what happens to all the people who bid in an auction but didn’t win? They actually have a Buy Now option, to purchase the product at the listed price, minus the value of the bids they placed. So as long as you’re willing to ultimately purchase the item at QuiBids' retail price, participating in an auction is a no-loss proposition.
So, if you want a clever way to save up to 95% such as a Samsung HDTV for $54.33, a New iPad for $23.42 or a Canon Rebel T3i Camera bundle for $43.76, check out QuiBids today.
Click here to see what products are selling on QuiBids right now.