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Saturday, August 30, 2014

Also Pakistan - IV - Pakistan - DAWN.COM 60s pics

Also Pakistan - IV - Pakistan - DAWN.COM    

The first men on the moon land in Pakistan. Astronauts Neil Armstrong
and Buzz Aldrin (the first men to land on the moon), arrived in Karachi
in early 1970 during their tour of South Asia. Here they are seen being
greeted by an enthusiastic crowd just outside the Karachi Airport.
–Picture courtesy LIFE.


_________________________________


A young Pakistani woman sitting on her motorbike in the Soldier Bazzar area of Karachi (1969). –Picture courtesy Zarmeena P.


_________________________________


The December 1971 cover of Time magazine. The main story detailed the
breaking away of former East Pakistan (after a bloody civil war with
the West Pakistan army) . The picture is that of a Bengali militant
celebrating the defeat of the West Pakistan military.

Friday, August 29, 2014

Henry Kissinger on the Assembly of a New World Order - WSJ

Henry Kissinger on the Assembly of a New World Order - WSJ: "The penalty for failing will be not so much a major war between states (though in some regions this remains possible) as an evolution into spheres of influence identified with particular domestic structures and forms of governance. At its edges, each sphere would be tempted to test its strength against other entities deemed illegitimate. A struggle between regions could be even more debilitating than the struggle between nations has been.

The contemporary quest for world order will require a coherent strategy to establish a concept of order within the various regions and to relate these regional orders to one another. These goals are not necessarily self-reconciling: The triumph of a radical movement might bring order to one region while setting the stage for turmoil in and with all others. The domination of a region by one country militarily, even if it brings the appearance of order, could produce a crisis for the rest of the world.

A world order of states affirming individual dignity and participatory governance, and cooperating internationally in accordance with agreed-upon rules, can be our hope and should be our inspiration. But progress toward it will need to be sustained through a series of intermediary stages.

To play a responsible role in the evolution of a 21st-century world order, the U.S. must be prepared to answer a number of questions for itself: What do we seek to prevent, no matter how it happens, and if necessary alone? What do we seek to achieve, even if not supported by any multilateral effort? What do we seek to achieve, or prevent, only if supported by an alliance? What should we not engage in, even if urged on by a multilateral group or an alliance? What is the nature of the values that we seek to advance? And how much does the application of these values depend on circumstance?

For the U.S., this will require thinking on two seemingly contradictory levels. The celebration of universal principles needs to be paired with recognition of the reality of other regions' histories, cultures and views of their security. Even as the lessons of challenging decades are examined, the affirmation of America's exceptional nature must be sustained. History offers no respite to countries that set aside their sense of identity in favor of a seemingly less arduous course. But nor does it assure success for the most elevated convictions in the absence of a comprehensive geopolitical strategy.

— Dr. Kissinger served as national security adviser and secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. Adapted from his book "World Order," to be published Sept. 9 by the Penguin Press."



'via Blog this'

Henry Kissinger on the Assembly of a New World Order - WSJ

Henry Kissinger on the Assembly of a New World Order - WSJ: "The penalty for failing will be not so much a major war between states (though in some regions this remains possible) as an evolution into spheres of influence identified with particular domestic structures and forms of governance. At its edges, each sphere would be tempted to test its strength against other entities deemed illegitimate. A struggle between regions could be even more debilitating than the struggle between nations has been.

The contemporary quest for world order will require a coherent strategy to establish a concept of order within the various regions and to relate these regional orders to one another. These goals are not necessarily self-reconciling: The triumph of a radical movement might bring order to one region while setting the stage for turmoil in and with all others. The domination of a region by one country militarily, even if it brings the appearance of order, could produce a crisis for the rest of the world.

A world order of states affirming individual dignity and participatory governance, and cooperating internationally in accordance with agreed-upon rules, can be our hope and should be our inspiration. But progress toward it will need to be sustained through a series of intermediary stages.

To play a responsible role in the evolution of a 21st-century world order, the U.S. must be prepared to answer a number of questions for itself: What do we seek to prevent, no matter how it happens, and if necessary alone? What do we seek to achieve, even if not supported by any multilateral effort? What do we seek to achieve, or prevent, only if supported by an alliance? What should we not engage in, even if urged on by a multilateral group or an alliance? What is the nature of the values that we seek to advance? And how much does the application of these values depend on circumstance?

For the U.S., this will require thinking on two seemingly contradictory levels. The celebration of universal principles needs to be paired with recognition of the reality of other regions' histories, cultures and views of their security. Even as the lessons of challenging decades are examined, the affirmation of America's exceptional nature must be sustained. History offers no respite to countries that set aside their sense of identity in favor of a seemingly less arduous course. But nor does it assure success for the most elevated convictions in the absence of a comprehensive geopolitical strategy.

— Dr. Kissinger served as national security adviser and secretary of state under Presidents Nixon and Ford. Adapted from his book "World Order," to be published Sept. 9 by the Penguin Press."



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90pc MPs are tax evaders and killers, claims Imran - thenews.com.pk

90pc MPs are tax evaders and killers, claims Imran - thenews.com.pk



partial copy here



He
informed the audience that General Raheel told him that Nawaz Sharif was
not willing to resign. Imran informed the army chief that an
independent probe into the vote fraud was not possible if Nawaz stayed
as the prime minister, which was also against the
internationally-accepted democratic norms.

The PTI chairman
continued that he told the army chief that he would not withdraw from
the demand for the prime minister’s resignation. He said those who stood
with Nawaz Sharif to save the democracy should listen that Nawaz Sharif
was also telling a lie to them.



On this occasion, Imran
warned his party legislators who had not resigned yet to tender their
resignations by Friday evening or they would be thrown out of the
party.The PTI chief stressed he would remain in Islamabad whether the
people showed up or not. “I have decided to win either freedom or death,
otherwise I shall not move from here,” Imran said.



In
another speech later, he alleged that Nawaz was in panic and was now
taking wrong decisions and pointed out that he had no personal tiff with
the prime minister.He said Nawaz feared if his rivals succeeded in
their ongoing movement what would be the fate of his rule and his family
business besides being deprived of commission.



Imran
noted that the genie had come out of the bottle and now the monarchy of
Sharif could not sent back into the bottle.The PTI chief referred to the
establishment of first welfare state in Madina, wherein law was equal
for all and there were no VIPs or special classes. “The state took
responsibility of the poor and the weak,” he said and also gave examples
from the tenure of the first two caliphs.



There were so
many cases against Nawaz and Leader of the Opposition in the National
Assembly Khursheed Shah, he alleged, that they would never allow the NAB
to hold them accountable. Similarly, he continued, in such a scenario
who would bring back Zardari’s money stashed in foreign banks.



Imran
vowed to bring back $200 billion from the Swiss banks. He regretted
that those in the assemblies became billionaires while the masses became
poorer.



The PTI core committee also had its session at
the mobile stage and later Imran told the audience that his party
supporters would stage large protest rallies in Karachi, Lahore,
Faisalabad and Multan on Saturday.



In a new Pakistan,
Imran promised to ensure the supremacy of law and focus on fighting
poverty and job creation so that the state institutions such as the
police could not blindly follow the wrong orders of the rulers and open
fire at them.



He said there would be uniformity in the
syllabi without any discrimination between the rich and the poor. In
this context, he gave the example of his Shaukat Khanum Cancer Hospital
that offers treatment to the poor and the rich equally. He also
mentioned the Namal University, where 90 percent students could not
afford fee on their own and were studying on scholarships.



The PTI chief also promised to introduce reforms in the police department and the judici

Govt on back foot as army looks to continue ‘mediation’ - Pakistan - DAWN.COM

Govt on back foot as army looks to continue ‘mediation’ - Pakistan - DAWN.COM  



some story here 

However, shortly after the tweet, the government tried to fight back
from the awkward position it found itself in after the ISPR statement.

The
charge was led by Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan, who based
his defence on the claim that the government had asked the military for
“facilitation”, not “mediation”.

He accused the PTI and PAT of trying to use the army to further their personal political agenda.

Addressing a press conference, he said that confusion about the army’s role in the dialogue had been created deliberately.

“The
government has assigned the army the responsibility of playing a
facilitative role and nothing should be construed beyond that,” he
remarked, downplaying rumours of a rift between the civilian and
military leadership.

He said the armed forces were apolitical and
discharged their duties within the ambit of the law. The decision to
involve the army was also in line with the constitution, he said, adding
that the words ‘mediator’ and ‘guarantor’ were being used to convey an
incorrect impression. He said the ISPR statement had been issued in
consultation with the government and reflected the government’s point of
view.

He maintained that the protesting parties had confidence
in the army and had already rejected any mediation through parliament,
civil society as well as various administrative and judicial forums for
the settlement of the prevailing dispute.

The minister, though, was optimistic that a solution to the crisis could be found through dialogue.

He
said that two heads of state had already cancelled visits to Pakistan
over the sit-ins. The Chinese president is scheduled to arrive on an
important visit next month, a visit that will see energy agreements to
the tune of 10,000 megawatts and other pacts in the defence arena. “This
has also been conveyed to the army chief,” he said.

Separately,
sources from the government side denied Chaudhry Nisar’s claim that the
ISPR chief’s statement on Friday night was issued “in consultation” with
the government.

Published in Dawn, August 30th, 2014

Reluctant revolutionaries ‘bound to stay’ at sit-ins - Pakistan - DAWN.COM

Reluctant revolutionaries ‘bound to stay’ at sit-ins - Pakistan - DAWN.COM



some of story here  









Supporters of Pakistani
opposition politician Imran Khan and populist cleric Tahir-ul-Qadri eat
during an anti-government march in Islamabad on August 28, 2014. —Photo
by AFP
ISLAMABAD: Not all the demonstrators on Constitution
Avenue are there of their own free will. Indeed, there are many who want
to leave but are compelled to stay on. This is especially true for the
younger participants of the Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf and Pakistan Awami
Tehreek’s sit-ins, who have better things to do with their time than
sitting around waiting on the world to change.

Najma Islam is a
19-year-old from Multan. She was sitting in the shade of some trees
outside the Federal Board of Revenue building, books in hand.

She
told Dawn she was preparing for her medical entry test, which was
scheduled to be held on August 31. “I am very worried about how I’ll
perform, because I’ve been here for the past couple of weeks, when I
could have been studying,” she said.

Najma’s father has been an
ardent follower of Dr Qadri for nearly a decade now and made his entire
family come to the march because “he had promised his leader”.


Not all participants of sit-ins there of their own accord


“I obtained more than 80 per cent marks in my FSc exams and was
enrolled in a tuition academy, preparing for the entry test when my
father told me we had to go to Lahore for the long march. It was very
difficult for me to study during the march. I could at least read my
notes in the daylight, but at night, there was no light to read by,” she
said.

The 47-year-old Hajra Bibi is from Hafizabad and has come to the march with her husband and children.

“My
husband is a school teacher and he decided he wanted to participate in
this march because he wants to change the political system of the
country,” she said.

Hajra told Dawn that when they left their house, he husband promised her that change would come in a few days.

“But so far, it hasn’t seemed like things will change anytime soon, even if we stay here for another week,” she said.

“It’s
horrible. I’ve had to make my children wear their old, dirty clothes
because there is no water available to wash them. Ever since we’ve been
here, my daughter has contracted cholera due to the unhygienic
conditions outside parliament,” Hajra added.

“I just want to take
my kids back home, because their schools have reopened. But my husband
keeps pleading with me to stay on until the revolution comes,” she said,
exasperatedly.

Ruqia Batool, a 22-year-old from Chakwal has also
come to Islamabad at the behest of her father. “He believes in Dr
Tahirul Qadri’s ideology. He asked my mother to come along as well but
she refused, so my sister and I came with him instead,” she told Dawn.

She
said she had found it very hard to sleep in the uncomfortable
conditions outside the corridors of power. “My younger sister had to sit
for the University of Engineering and Technology entry test and she
went straight from the sit-in,” Ruqia added.

Ishrat Jabeen, a 23-year-old from G-9, says she’s lucky to have a home in the city.

“My
family supports the PAT and while I like to visit D-Chowk with my
family every evening, I can’t imagine being camped out here for two
weeks or more,” she said.

She told Dawn that several women from
the PAT sit-in would give her their mobile phones to charge. “It pains
me to see the horrible conditions that these brave men and women have to
face while at Constitution Avenue,” she said.

Salma Mukhtar, 26, lives in E-11 and goes to D-Chowk every day to hear PTI chief Imran Khan speak.

The party leadership should announce an end to their sit-in, or they will lose their support and popularity in the days to come.

Ahmed
Khan, a 24-year-old from Karak told Dawn he had been in Islamabad since
Independence Day. “I am not used to living out in the open, but we’ve
persevered because we have been promised change by our leader,” he said.

Jody Hice: 'Most People Think Islam Is A Religion, It's Not'

Jody Hice: 'Most People Think Islam Is A Religion, It's Not': "Jody Hice, a radio show host and GOP congressional candidate from Georgia, made anti-Islamic statements in his 2012 book, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

"Although Islam has a religious component, it is much more than a simple religious ideology," Hice wrote in his book titled "It's Now Or Never: A Call To Reclaim America." "It is a complete geo-political structure and, as such, does not deserve First Amendment protection."

Hice is a Baptist minister who is challenging businessman Mike Collins in a July 22 GOP primary runoff for Rep. Paul Broun's (R-Ga.) seat. This isn't the first time he has made offensive comments about Islam.


According to The Citizen, at a July 12, 2011 event sponsored by the Coweta County Tea Party Patriots, Hice argued that Islam isn't even a religion.

"Most people think Islam is a religion, it’s not. It’s a totalitarian way of life with a religious component," he said. "But it’s much larger. It’s a geo-political system that has governmental, financial, military, legal and religious components. And it’s a totalitarian system that encompasses every aspect of life and it should not be protected [under U.S. law]."

Hice didn't stop there.

"This is not a tolerant, peaceful religion even though some Muslims are peaceful. Radical Muslims believe that Sharia is required by God and must be imposed worldwide," he said. "It’s a movement to take over the world by force. A global caliphate is the objective. That’s why Islam would not qualify for First Amendment protection since it’s a geopolitical system ... This is a huge thing to realize and I hope you do. This will impact our lives if we don’t get a handle on it."

He also doubted the compatibility of Islam and the Constitution.

"These things are in no way compatible with the U.S. Constitution ... Islam and the Constitution are oceans apart," Hice said. "It’s about controlling your behavior, when and where you can worship and legal issues. The number one threat is to our worldview and whether we chunk it for secularism or Islam."

"



'via Blog this'

Non-bailable arrest warrant for Qadri, 71 activists - Pakistan - DAWN.COM

Non-bailable arrest warrant for Qadri, 71 activists - Pakistan - DAWN.COM 



GUJRANWALA: Anti-Terrorism Court No 2 Judge Ittefaq
Abbasi on Friday issued a non-bailable arrest warrant for Pakistan Awami
Tehreek chief Dr Tahirul Qadri and 71 activists of his party, and
ordered police to produce them in court on Sept 5.

The court also directed police to submit a chargesheet against them by Sept 2.

The
court had already issued arrest warrant of the PAT chief on Aug 22 and
Aug 29 but police could not arrest him as he was leading a sit-in in
Islamabad.

Police said 71 PAT activists were involved in
attacking police and injuring more than 76 officials during their march
on GT Road Sadhoki on Aug 8. Police had registered a case against them
under the terrorism act.

Meanwhile, Anti-Terrorism Court No 1
Judge Imtiaz Ahmad accepted bail applications of 50 activists of PAT and
Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf and ordered their release on submission of
surety bonds worth Rs100,000 each.

According to the prosecution,
the activists were involved in attacking police and injuring over 71
officials, including DSP Rashid Sundho, and two SHOs during their march
on Aug 8 on GT Road Sadhoki.

Police sent them to the central jail after registering a case against them under the terrorism act.

The
Anti-Terrorism Court No 2 had already accepted bail application of 64
activists of both parties on Thursday on surety bonds worth Rs100,000
each. The court directed the workers to avoid repeating such activities.

PROTEST: Motorcycle rickshaw owners blocked GT Road near toll plaza against motorway police for challaning them “without reason”.

They
claimed traffic police wardens and motorway police on GT Road were
challaning their vehicles over “minor mistakes”. They claimed their
vehicles were being ‘targeted’ at behest of a private bus company and
wagon owners as motorcycle rickshaw owners were providing cheap travel
facilities, while bus and wagon owners were fleecing commuters and
extorting heavy fares.

Published in Dawn, August 30th, 2014

To Coup or not to Coup – The Express Tribune Ayesha Siddiqa

To Coup or not to Coup – The Express Tribune


To Coup or not to Coup

Published: August 28, 2014

The writer is an independent social scientist and author of Military Inc.
It’s often that one comes across people these days who are either
concerned about the long march or if there will eventually be a coup in
the country. There are those who get genuinely uncomfortable at the idea
of a coup. Then there are others who want the information regarding
which way the winds will blow to re-position themselves in time. This
kind of a status quo, in which predicting day to day, become difficult
and is extremely unnerving. People may actually surrender because
clarity of a position brings relief of some kind.


In any case, this is being fought as a one-sided war. Notwithstanding
the general public’s discomfort with the present state of governance,
the volume of naya Pakistan
seems to have been kept deliberately high so that other voices drown
out completely. The additional problem with the din of the new narrative
is that it has almost linked Pakistan’s survival with the power of a
single man — Imran Khan. He alone has the right to get elected and all
those who don’t vote for him have probably blasphemed. Interestingly,
the bulk of the media is covering the political show without commercial
breaks which raises questions about their source of money.


The stalemate has brought about a soft coup. The government may be
physically surviving but its credibility has taken a hit. Even if the
marchers would go home tomorrow, it would probably take the rest of the
remaining term for the government to convince the world that it is still
in control. The fact is that the prime minister seems to have been
confined to the administration of a small area rather than a
medium-sized nuclear weapon state. Domestically, it will have to operate
with zero margin of error as far as governance is concerned. Perhaps,
the threat will dissipate after some ‘other’ people retire and go home.


But it is equally possible that some of the men on horseback may not
be entirely satisfied with the idea of going the whole hog. Thus, the
possibility of a hard coup remains equally high. What keeps it away is
possibly that there is still a lot of thought being put into what will
replace the present set-up. According to the grapevine, there is a lack
of consensus within the armed forces regarding fate of the government.
Notwithstanding claims that the army would keep away from direct
involvement because of its involvement in North Waziristan and now the
eastern border, there are those who seem sceptical about the idea of
trusting a civilian leadership that could threaten them at their own
base. It’s the melting away of power which may unnerve some of those who
have lots of it. The civilian regime may make a lot of unnecessary
concessions to keep the boys either happy or divided but it is
ultimately the longevity and probability of challenging some of the core
institutional interests that make some amongst the deep state
resentful.


The situation may change when some of the old brass goes home in a
couple of months. The newer officers may not share the same instinct.
But the question is that even another 15 days or a month in these
conditions would make things even more painful. The virtual collapse of
the government (spiritually if not physically) is imminent.


Someone watching Pakistan from afar would really wonder if the state
has not begun to resemble some of the countries in Africa. There is a
deep power struggle amongst the ruling elite that totally ignores the
fact that the country and its people cannot afford this kind of life
style. Anarchy, in fact, has become Pakistan’s trademark. The battle for
and obsession with power is to a degree that while challenging
opponents leaders do not consider longer interest of the state and its
people. Asking people not to pay taxes or sending money through official
channels is not just about starving the government. It is about
establishing a very bad habit that the country can ill-afford. What if
Imran Khan makes the government tomorrow which does not meet an ideal
standard that he seems to have set for his followers? This is not
protest but a criminalisation of politics which is as bad as some of
what he seems to object to.


We hear little about the negative impact of the current state of
politics. People are actually losing opportunities and the economy is
bleeding money faster than usual. The small and medium entrepreneurs
that I talked to recently in various cities of Punjab complained about
how business has almost dried up since the marches were announced. The
reason people are not crying out loud and surviving is probably due to a
parallel economy. The pro-government rallies are not likely to help
improve conditions but increase the threat of a real conflict. Many
believe that the clash between mobs is what might open doors for a hard
coup.


Perhaps, the powers that be should take a plunge. It will be
interesting to see what they then feel about a world they created
themselves. The establishment and its many intellectual clients often
refer to the Bangladesh model. What they often forget is that Dhaka’s
political system or people’s choices did not change even with
intervention. The challenges are far bigger than what some of the
foreign qualified Chicago trained economists, commercial bankers or
development gurus could manage to even understand. The US has some of
the best universities but it has also produced experts that have often
messed up with developing states rather than put things right. The
question is can Pakistan afford such experimentation?


This is a not a moment for personal egos but for compromises which
aim at benefiting the country and not just the individual. Instead of
aiming at resignation of the prime minister it would help if Imran and Qadri
could extract commitment for transparent institutional changes which
will take this country a long way. If not then we have terribly lost our
way into an endless abyss.


Published in The Express Tribune, August 28th, 2014.

http://www.dawn.com/news/1128566/govt-pti-deadlock-persists

http://www.dawn.com/news/1128566/govt-pti-deadlock-persists






File photo
ISLAMABAD: The latest round of talks between the Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf (PTI) and the government has led to no development and the deadlock continues to persist between the two sides.
Speaking to media representatives after the conclusion of today's talks at the Convention Centre in Islamabad, Shah Mehmood Qureshi, who was leading PTI's delegation, said his party had asked the government to offer an explanation over the position it took in Parliament.
“The government’s response in the National Assembly was fallacious,” a visibly upset Qureshi said, adding that the difference in the versions of PTI and the government was reflective of the trust deficit prevailing between the two sides.
However, we still went ahead with the meeting, the PTI leader said, adding that the party's delegates again briefed government representatives about the six points that the party had originally laid out before it.
The meeting came hours after Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan trashed the impression that the government had sought the army's help to mediate the deadlock in Islamabad. Today was also the first time that the government held joint talks with delegates from the PTI and Pakistan Awami Tehreek (PAT) delegates.
Government and PAT representatives haven't been seen to have left the meeting room and it wasn't clear whether the talks between the two had reached a conclusion.
The dialogue as it began was being seen to have reached a definitive round especially after General Raheel Sharif held separate meetings with Imran Khan and Tahirul Qadri. However, the developments as they transpired have only given the impression of a continuing impasse.
For today's round of discussions, the government's committee was being led by Ishaq Dar and included Pervez Rasheed, Ahsan Iqbal, Abdul Qadir Baloch and Zahid Hamid. The PTI was represented by Asad Umar, Jahangir Tareen, Pervez Khattak, Shafqat Mahmood and Shah Mehmood Qureshi. The PAT had sent Khurram Gondal, Raheeq Abbasi and Sahibzada Hamid Raza from its side. Governor Punjab Chaudhry Muhammad Sarwar, who has been shuttling from his base to Karachi and Islamabad, had managed to reach the meeting some time after it began.
Also read: Untiring Imran puts talks on hold till Nawaz's resignation
Both PTI and PAT have remained unflinching in their demands, especially the one relating to Nawaz's resignation, with Imran saying he will not give in to the government's efforts to "buy him out".

Altaf demands formation of 'technocrat govt'


Meanwhile, Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) chief Altaf Hussain demanded that a technocrat government should be formed to diffuse prevailing political tension in the country.
Speaking to a private TV channel, he urged the military leadership not to "delay taking over the government."
The MQM chief said that corps commanders should not wait any longer and establish their 'writ' in the country.
"Pakistan Army should step forward to save the country ... through any means, constitutional or not," he said.